Here and There Japan

A. Donwerth-Chikamatsu

February 18, 2011
by anniedc
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Sewing Machine Practice (Junior High School)

 

Little Brother is in ninth grade and is taking high school entrance exams. While cleaning his room for him, I found this. It is a cloth practice sheet from his seventh grade sewing class. He had to follow these lines on a sewing machine. The white thread he used doesn’t show up in this photo. Click to enlarge the photo.

Anyway, on the far left, he folded over the cloth and sewed it following a straight line. Next to that, he had to go down a straight line and then make two corners and continue upward. Click on the label below for other posts about school sewing projects.

October 17, 2008
by anniedc
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Public Junior High School: Lunch Apron & Bandanna

 

Little Brother is in public junior high school. This is his school’s lunch apron and bandanna. Each week a different group of students serve lunch to the rest of the class in their classroom. They wear aprons over their school uniforms.

Little Brother didn’t wear a school uniform in elementary school. He wore a white coat and hat when he served lunch. Click on the category below to see more about Japanese school lunch.

June 6, 2007
by anniedc
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Water Bottle for School

 

Little Brother has been taking a water bottle to school since Monday. He prefers one that has a cup. He also prefers to take mugicha or barley water instead of water.

At his elementary school, teachers announce when they can start bringing water bottles and then later in the early fall when to stop bringing them. The students are free to drink whenever they are thristy.

All students walk to and from school. The school is not air conditioned, and they spend a lot of time outdoors, too. Having water bottles at school cuts down on time spent at the water fountain.

May 14, 2007
by anniedc
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Tissues

 

Everyone seems to carry packages of tissues with them at all times. Papa, Big Sister and Little Brother carry a handkerchief and at least one package of tissues in their pockets. (I carry mine in my bag.) They need a handkerchief for the restroom at school and at the office. Most Tokyo public restrooms in our area have paper towels these days.

Packages of tissues are used as advertising. People stand on the streets (usually around stations) and hand them out to passersby. The package in the top left hand corner has an advertisement on the plastic packaging. The smaller packages are for kindergarteners and pre-schoolers. The white package with the bunny face has lotion type tissues. They are really soft.

See handkerchiefs.

April 29, 2007
by anniedc
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Handkerchiefs

 

Handkerchiefs are needed at school because there are no paper towels in the restrooms. (Some public rest rooms now have paper towels.) The Thomas and the Shinkansen, Japanese bullet train, handkerchiefs were Little Brother’s in kindergarten. The one laying flat has characters from a cartoon about Anpanman (bean paste bread man). Little Brother carried that one in kindergarten, too. It’s a terrycloth towel. He carries the plaid one and others like it now in elementary school. The white one is for funerals.

April 24, 2007
by anniedc
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Contact Notebook

 

This notebook is sometimes used for writing down assignments or announcements, but it is also used for communication with the teacher. When a student is absent, a parent must write a message to the teacher in this notebook. At Little Brother’s school the notebook is then put in this zippered pouch and taken by a classmate to the teacher. This notebook, homework assignments, worksheets or handouts are put in the pouch and taken back to the absent student. Textbooks are kept at home.

April 24, 2007
by anniedc
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Class Notebooks

 

This is one of Little Brother’s notebooks. Many designs are available. This one supports UNICEF.

Some notebooks have marks on them. The triangle and the hands that form the “e” tells that the notebook is kind to the environment. Bell marks are collected by schools to get money for equipment. Do a blog search of “bell mark” for more information.

There are different notebooks for different subjects. The 5mm masu is the size of the squares in this notebook.

This is one of Little Brother’s fifth grade science notebooks. A teacher’s handout was glued on one end of a page.

April 23, 2007
by anniedc
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Fifth Grade Japanese Class

 

Little Brother had Japanese class every day last year (see the schedule posted on April 18). These were his kanji books. Each book had a chart of new kanji in the back. There were a total of 156 in these fifth grade books. Click to enlarge the picture to get a closer look. Some exercises were written in the textbook.

Some Japanese language exercises were done in a notebook. On this page, Little Brother numbered and wrote the answers vertically, from top to bottom. Note that he started from the outside of the page and worked his way to the center of the notebook. # 1 through 4 are on the left near the edge of the page. #20 is near the center of the book.

This type of paper is used when practicing how to write kanji. The dotted lines within the square help the student know how big to make the strokes and where to put them.

They can also use notebooks with paper like this.

Students put a plastic sheet under the paper so that there is no imprint on the other pages in the notebook.

Kids Web Japan– kanji

April 20, 2007
by anniedc
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Fifth Grade Math Textbooks

 

Little Brother used these math books in fifth grade last year. They are long, narrow books. There are 40 pages in each book. The book on the far right is the answer booklet.

Do you recognize the character on the front of the textbooks? He is called Astro Boy outside of Japan. He is called Atomu in Japan. The girl is Uran.

The first page of each book is a table of contents. Here are the first pages of math problems in each textbook. Click to enlarge.

There is a certificate of completion at the end of each book. They did a lot of math worksheets, too. They call them purinto. It’s the English word “print” in Japanese pronounciation.

They studied fractions, decimals, and geometry, etc. in fifth grade.

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